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To fully serve the community, the Mid-county Memo offers this section to showcase upcoming special events, celebrations of milestones in our readers' lives, those seemingly small accomplishments that often do not receive the recognition they deserve, and everyday events that should be shared with friends and neighbors along with opportunities to participate in the community. Memo Pad submissions for the July issue are due Saturday, June 15. For best results, e-mail Darlene Vinson at editor@midcountymemo.com. Or mail submissions to 3510 N.E. 134th Ave, Portland, OR 97230. To leave a phone message, call 503-287-8904. The fax number is 503-249-7672.

Parkrose leadership advisor nabs state title
Parkrose High School teacher Mike Verhulst was recently named Oregon Schools Activities Association Advisor of the Year.
COURTESY PARKROSE SCHOOL DISTRICT
Mike Verhulst of Parkrose High School is the Oregon High School Activities Advisor of the Year. The award was announced at the annual Oregon Association of Student Councils spring conference.

Bethany Burgess, PHS Associated Student Body president, nominated Verhulst. She said Verhulst “encompasses the new definition of being an activities director. He is not only a leadership teacher; he's the Future Business Leaders of America Advisor and an assistant golf coach.” Her nomination letter included praise from students who shared their belief that Verhulst has helped them to develop a team mentality, allowing all students to have a voice regardless of the leadership positions they hold.

PHS Principal Jared Freeman said Verhulst's “dedication to our school and students has been exceptional, and his leadership has helped to positively impact the school environment for every student that attends Parkrose High School.”

Verhulst will represent Oregon for regional and national honors as well.

Grads pass one last test
Tensions were high the afternoon of April 19 as Ms. Baumbach's eighth grade social studies class at St. Therese School was dressed to the nines ready to give their speeches in front of six judges, including two practicing attorneys. The Congressional Mock Hearings have become a rite of passage for St. Therese's eighth graders. Giving a speech and then having to back up their opinions in front of the middle school and professionals can be a daunting experience.

“I liked the hearings, but it made me really nervous. What I learned is how to be more confident and speak in front of crowds better,” said Whitney Warth. For Delina Biniam the process sparked a future goal. “I now have a strong passion for politics that I may reconsider becoming a lawyer…. I also want to be active in foreign affairs,” she said. Matthew Juson loved the hearings, saying, “I learned about civic virtue and the republican government and how it was made.”

This exercise not only tests the students' abilities to speak in front of a group and work as a team, but also made many appreciate the government in a much more profound way. Anna Khouri “learned that the government has a lot to do, and trying to keep people happy is very hard,” while Kyle Wright liked “learning about the powers given to each side of the government.”

This exercise was the final significant project the students will do at St. Therese before their graduation June 10. Most of the students have been together since kindergarten. When they reminisce about growing up together, you can sense a strong bond. Many talk of being close to their classmates and always being able to count on them in times of need. Biniam proclaimed the class as “culturally diverse and welcoming of others. We practice civic virtue.” Wanjiku Njuguna lamented that she “will miss the unity and good times.”

Sixteen of the 18 students will be attending Catholic high schools. All students are looking forward to the new experiences high school will bring. Extracurricular activities and clubs seem to be top of the list. Warth, who will be attending Central Catholic High School in the fall, really captured the spirit of excitement for the future: “I am looking forward to starting a whole new chapter in my life…. In the end I will always be able to come back to these true friends.”

Longtime PCS teacher retires
Teacher Ed Highman retires after more than three decades at Portland Christian Schools.
COURTESY LINDA HIGHMAN
Ed Highman, sixth grade teacher at Portland Christian Schools, will end his career of 42 years on June 13. On that afternoon, the school he has served for 31years will host a retirement celebration beginning at 12:30 at its elementary school campus at 11845 S.E. Market St. All students, parents, and colleagues, past and present, are invited.

Highman received his training at Bob Jones University in Greenville, S.C. He taught sixth grade for 11 years in Salem, and came to east Portland in the spring of 1982. When he began his career, the “middle school” concept was still a notion of the future. Therefore, he never taught just two or three subjects a day to students cycling through his classroom. He taught all subjects, ranging from math to art. To average thousands of grades across four decades, he has used hand-held calculators to the latest grading software, but first he used paper, pencil, and his own mental computer during most of the '70s.

He has taught in the same classroom at PCES for 31 years, directing Outdoor School and the annual fifth and sixth grade musical for many of those years. Believing in the value of drills, he used them as games to reinforce the facts of math, spelling, and geography; then he rewarded with candy. Encouraging his sixth graders to keep focused thinking, neat desks, and strong convictions, Highman's constant admonition was “be prepared for seventh grade.” And as sixth grade drew to a close each year, he held a promotion banquet and took his class for an all-day picnic at Blue Lake Park.

Not only has Highman taught in east Portland since 1982, he has lived only in the Mill Park and Hazelwood neighborhoods. Recently he has become a part of the Resurrection Players as actor and lighting operator.

Saturday, June 15 his family plans a large retirement celebration at Resurrection Lutheran Church, 1700 NE 132nd Ave. Doors to this memory lane party will open at 5 p.m., a salad potluck will begin at 5:30, and a program featuring voices from Highman's 42-year career will follow at 6:30 p.m. All who have been a part of this long run are invited to attend, bringing a salad and memories to share. Those who plan to attend are requested to contact Linda Highman at lindaehighman@msn.com or 503-254-76257.

Sunday Parkways misses the rain
East Portland Sunday Parkways participants roll along at the May 12 event.
Out of consideration for someone or something, the rain on May 12 didn't commence until late afternoon, giving the east Portland version of Sunday Parkways nearly perfect weather. Linda Ginenthal of the Portland Bureau of Transportation estimates that 12,000 people walked or biked the course, not a record but still impressive.

Laptops for scholars
Multnomah Education Service District and the E2 Foundation have awarded laptop computers to students graduating from area alternative high schools. Multnomah ESD formed the E2 Foundation in 1995 to support the variety of programs and services to students, families and schools.

The students attend schools that are part of the Alternative Pathways consortium, a federally funded TRIO project operated by MESD since 1998. TRIO is an educational opportunity program for low-income and first-generation students to pursue postsecondary education.

They have been selected for the laptop award by the staff of each school in recognition of their academic achievement, college potential and financial need.

Alternative Pathways assists alternative high school students who are the first in their family to go to college, are from low-income families, or who have the potential to succeed in postsecondary education. The program increases the number of youth who graduate from high school or earn a GED and enroll in a postsecondary institution. To achieve that goal Alternative Pathways provides students with academic, career, social, and cultural opportunities.

The E2 Foundation is the nonprofit fundraising arm of Multnomah ESD.

Here are this year's Alternative Pathways Scholars from mid-county:

Reynolds Learning Academy
Mercedes Lamont
Hector Garcia
Delia Martinez

Helensview High School
Tyler Leigh Carlson-Krager
Asiah Burroughs
Almena Chavez

Donate now for a merry Christmas
Summer may be just around the corner, but Human Solutions is getting a jump on donations for its Holiday Store for low-income and homeless children and their families.

Human Solutions' goal this year is to provide 200 families with free gifts and household essentials this holiday season. Those families include more than 500 children, ages newborn to 17. Human Solutions is seeking donations of toys, games, books, clothing, jackets, underwear and other essential items to stock the store. The agency is also accepting cash donations, and has launched a “Christmas in June” campaign to find 100 area businesses and individuals willing to donate $50 to the Holiday Store. Gresham Ford will match the first $1,000 in cash donations for the second consecutive year.

The Holiday Store is a tradition for Human Solutions, which provides services to low-income families and individuals in outer east Portland and East Multnomah County. The Holiday Store is unique in that it gives parents the independence to choose free gifts for their children in a retail setting with the assistance of a personal shopper. Many families are transitioning out of homelessness into housing, and are in need of the very basics to set up a household. For some families, these gifts are not only the only gifts they will receive at the holidays but throughout the entire year.

A group of volunteers has successfully organized the Holiday Store since 2005. Over the course of the year, these volunteers shop around for good deals on clothes, toys, games, hats, gloves and other essential items. Because the cost of these items can spike around the holidays, these elves like to get started early to find the best bargains. The public is also invited to purchase items directly and donate them to Human Solutions. Donated items may be dropped off at the Human Solutions office by appointment. Cash donations may be sent to Human Solutions in care of Sara Fisher, 12350 SE Powell Blvd., Portland, 97236. Please write “Holiday Store” in the memo line. If you have questions about this program, would like to volunteer, or are interested in holding a toy drive, please contact Sara Fisher at 503-548-0283.
To fully serve the community, the Mid-county Memo offers this section to showcase upcoming special events, celebrations of milestones in our readers' lives, those seemingly small accomplishments that often do not receive the recognition they deserve, and everyday events that should be shared with friends and neighbors along with opportunities to participate in the community. Memo Pad submissions for the July issue are due Saturday, June 15. For best results, e-mail Darlene Vinson at editor@midcountymemo.com. Or mail submissions to 3510 N.E. 134th Ave, Portland, OR 97230. To leave a phone message, call 503-287-8904. The fax number is 503-249-7672.

Parkrose leadership advisor nabs state title
Mike Verhulst of Parkrose High School is the Oregon High School Activities Advisor of the Year. The award was announced at the annual Oregon Association of Student Councils spring conference.

Bethany Burgess, PHS Associated Student Body president, nominated Verhulst. She said Verhulst “encompasses the new definition of being an activities director. He is not only a leadership teacher; he's the Future Business Leaders of America Advisor and an assistant golf coach.” Her nomination letter included praise from students who shared their belief that Verhulst has helped them to develop a team mentality, allowing all students to have a voice regardless of the leadership positions they hold.

PHS Principal Jared Freeman said Verhulst's “dedication to our school and students has been exceptional, and his leadership has helped to positively impact the school environment for every student that attends Parkrose High School.”

Verhulst will represent Oregon for regional and national honors as well.

Grads pass one last test
St. Therese 2013 graduating class. In the front row, from left, Alan Tang, Jessica Truong, Kristin Dinh, Joel Simmons, Brandon Gille, Kyle Wright and Adolfo Rivera. In the back row, from left, Wanjiku Njuguna, Anna Khouri, Whitney Warth, Delina Biniam, Nick Malone, Matthew Juson, Michael Metzger, Wyatt Allen, Chris Farrow, Tim Le and Madilyn Batiste.
COURTESY JANE BALLOU
Tensions were high the afternoon of April 19 as Ms. Baumbach's eighth grade social studies class at St. Therese School was dressed to the nines ready to give their speeches in front of six judges, including two practicing attorneys. The Congressional Mock Hearings have become a rite of passage for St. Therese's eighth graders. Giving a speech and then having to back up their opinions in front of the middle school and professionals can be a daunting experience.

“I liked the hearings, but it made me really nervous. What I learned is how to be more confident and speak in front of crowds better,” said Whitney Warth. For Delina Biniam the process sparked a future goal. “I now have a strong passion for politics that I may reconsider becoming a lawyer…. I also want to be active in foreign affairs,” she said. Matthew Juson loved the hearings, saying, “I learned about civic virtue and the republican government and how it was made.”

This exercise not only tests the students' abilities to speak in front of a group and work as a team, but also made many appreciate the government in a much more profound way. Anna Khouri “learned that the government has a lot to do, and trying to keep people happy is very hard,” while Kyle Wright liked “learning about the powers given to each side of the government.”

This exercise was the final significant project the students will do at St. Therese before their graduation June 10. Most of the students have been together since kindergarten. When they reminisce about growing up together, you can sense a strong bond. Many talk of being close to their classmates and always being able to count on them in times of need. Biniam proclaimed the class as “culturally diverse and welcoming of others. We practice civic virtue.” Wanjiku Njuguna lamented that she “will miss the unity and good times.”

Sixteen of the 18 students will be attending Catholic high schools. All students are looking forward to the new experiences high school will bring. Extracurricular activities and clubs seem to be top of the list. Warth, who will be attending Central Catholic High School in the fall, really captured the spirit of excitement for the future: “I am looking forward to starting a whole new chapter in my life…. In the end I will always be able to come back to these true friends.”

Sunday Parkways misses the rain
Out of consideration for someone or something, the rain on May 12 didn't commence until late afternoon, giving the east Portland version of Sunday Parkways nearly perfect weather. Linda Ginenthal of the Portland Bureau of Transportation estimates that 12,000 people walked or biked the course, not a record but still impressive.

Longtime PCS teacher retires
Ed Highman, sixth grade teacher at Portland Christian Schools, will end his career of 42 years on June 13. On that afternoon, the school he has served for 31years will host a retirement celebration beginning at 12:30 at its elementary school campus at 11845 S.E. Market St. All students, parents, and colleagues, past and present, are invited.

Highman received his training at Bob Jones University in Greenville, S.C. He taught sixth grade for 11 years in Salem, and came to east Portland in the spring of 1982. When he began his career, the “middle school” concept was still a notion of the future. Therefore, he never taught just two or three subjects a day to students cycling through his classroom. He taught all subjects, ranging from math to art. To average thousands of grades across four decades, he has used hand-held calculators to the latest grading software, but first he used paper, pencil, and his own mental computer during most of the '70s.

He has taught in the same classroom at PCES for 31 years, directing Outdoor School and the annual fifth and sixth grade musical for many of those years. Believing in the value of drills, he used them as games to reinforce the facts of math, spelling, and geography; then he rewarded with candy. Encouraging his sixth graders to keep focused thinking, neat desks, and strong convictions, Highman's constant admonition was “be prepared for seventh grade.” And as sixth grade drew to a close each year, he held a promotion banquet and took his class for an all-day picnic at Blue Lake Park.

Not only has Highman taught in east Portland since 1982, he has lived only in the Mill Park and Hazelwood neighborhoods. Recently he has become a part of the Resurrection Players as actor and lighting operator.

Saturday, June 15 his family plans a large retirement celebration at Resurrection Lutheran Church, 1700 NE 132nd Ave. Doors to this memory lane party will open at 5 p.m., a salad potluck will begin at 5:30, and a program featuring voices from Highman's 42-year career will follow at 6:30 p.m. All who have been a part of this long run are invited to attend, bringing a salad and memories to share. Those who plan to attend are requested to contact Linda Highman at lindaehighman@msn.com or 503-254-76257.

Laptops for scholars
Multnomah Education Service District and the E2 Foundation have awarded laptop computers to students graduating from area alternative high schools. Multnomah ESD formed the E2 Foundation in 1995 to support the variety of programs and services to students, families and schools.

The students attend schools that are part of the Alternative Pathways consortium, a federally funded TRIO project operated by MESD since 1998. TRIO is an educational opportunity program for low-income and first-generation students to pursue postsecondary education.

They have been selected for the laptop award by the staff of each school in recognition of their academic achievement, college potential and financial need.

Alternative Pathways assists alternative high school students who are the first in their family to go to college, are from low-income families, or who have the potential to succeed in postsecondary education. The program increases the number of youth who graduate from high school or earn a GED and enroll in a postsecondary institution. To achieve that goal Alternative Pathways provides students with academic, career, social, and cultural opportunities.

The E2 Foundation is the nonprofit fundraising arm of Multnomah ESD.

Here are this year's Alternative Pathways Scholars from mid-county:

Reynolds Learning Academy
Mercedes Lamont
Hector Garcia
Delia Martinez

Helensview High School
Tyler Leigh Carlson-Krager
Asiah Burroughs
Almena Chavez

Donate now for a merry Christmas
Summer may be just around the corner, but Human Solutions is getting a jump on donations for its Holiday Store for low-income and homeless children and their families.

Human Solutions' goal this year is to provide 200 families with free gifts and household essentials this holiday season. Those families include more than 500 children, ages newborn to 17. Human Solutions is seeking donations of toys, games, books, clothing, jackets, underwear and other essential items to stock the store. The agency is also accepting cash donations, and has launched a “Christmas in June” campaign to find 100 area businesses and individuals willing to donate $50 to the Holiday Store. Gresham Ford will match the first $1,000 in cash donations for the second consecutive year.

The Holiday Store is a tradition for Human Solutions, which provides services to low-income families and individuals in outer east Portland and East Multnomah County. The Holiday Store is unique in that it gives parents the independence to choose free gifts for their children in a retail setting with the assistance of a personal shopper. Many families are transitioning out of homelessness into housing, and are in need of the very basics to set up a household. For some families, these gifts are not only the only gifts they will receive at the holidays but throughout the entire year.

A group of volunteers has successfully organized the Holiday Store since 2005. Over the course of the year, these volunteers shop around for good deals on clothes, toys, games, hats, gloves and other essential items. Because the cost of these items can spike around the holidays, these elves like to get started early to find the best bargains. The public is also invited to purchase items directly and donate them to Human Solutions. Donated items may be dropped off at the Human Solutions office by appointment. Cash donations may be sent to Human Solutions in care of Sara Fisher, 12350 SE Powell Blvd., Portland, 97236. Please write “Holiday Store” in the memo line. If you have questions about this program, would like to volunteer, or are interested in holding a toy drive, please contact Sara Fisher at 503-548-0283.
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